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Ibanez

Ibanez guitars began their story with Hoshino Gakki, a music products and manuscript manufacturer, in Nagoya, Japan, in 1908. Hoshino Gakki imported high-end classical guitars from renowned builder Salvador Ibáñez in the late 1920s and began making their own guitars by the 1930s, adopting the name Ibanez. When rock n’ roll steered markets toward electric models, the company began to make budget guitars designed for export.

Already established on the American market, they switched their business model from cheap original designs to high-quality replica models of already established Fenders, Gibsons and other iconic American brands. This eventually resulted in a lawsuit from Gibson, which was settled 1978.

Their bold approach found it’s creative outlet in maintaining this level of craft with their own designs. Their guitars had already gained the attention of many high-profile artists in models such as the Grateful Dead’s Bob Weir and the Artist model, Kiss’ Paul Stanley and the Iceman and George Benson’s signature models.
Tailoring designs to artist’s needs would prove to be a definitive strength as the 80s and guitar-driven music rolled in. Their Saber (S series) and Roadstar (RG series) featured high-output pickups, floating double-locking trems, thin necks and deep cutaways. Guitar legends at the time such as Steve Vai, Joe Satriani and Pat Metheny were allowed to spec their own tailor-made models, which made Ibanez stand out as the leading artist-driven manufacturer at the time.
With the rise of Nu-Metal in the 2000's they began to re-develop their 7, 8 and 9 string models, popularized by groups like KoRn and Limp Bizkit at the time and opened up yet another whole new market of young shredders.
Today they have many aspects of the market covered with these innovations, alongside a reputation with models such as the Artcore and Artstar, AS and AF series as competitors in the traditional guitar and bass markets. Ibanez’s adaptability and artist-driven approach has enabled them to grow and diversify the guitar market for decades like few other brands.
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Ibanez Nu Tubescreamer
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A classic Overdrive gets refined for the 21st century. The Nutube Tubescreamer is basically a standard TS808 with inverted colors and the addition of the tiny, vacuum Nutube. It sounds organic and amp-like, offering exceptional dynamics. Like you'd expect it from a Tubescreamer, it tightens up the bottom end with a pleasant amount of compression. Besides the initial set of controls they've added a Mix knob to go from clean (CL) to overdrive (OD).  This is a well though-out addition to the pedal since most players use the Tubescreamer either as a Clean or as a Solo boost. This Mix knob enables you to further shape the character of the pedal to your specific use.The NTS has relay true-bypass switching, is all-analog and can be powered with 9 volt battery or 9-18 volts power supply where 18 volts deliver more headroom and gain.Follow your instincts and listen for yourself in the TonePedia Player!

Ibanez TS9 (1981)
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Are original run of Tubescreamers still the best? There are a few things in life which can divide friends and families. Politics, religion and yes ... Tube screamer chips.So if you're reading this you most likely know what the tube screamer is but to be safe, it's a low gain overdrive pedal which rolls off some low end and has a very specific mid frequency bump. Using our demo turn the gain down low, set the tone at noon and switch the pedal on and off to hear this fairly change fairly clearly.Throughout the years the Tubescreamer has gone through many many changes, six main models 808, TS-9, TS-10, TS-7 and the TS-5 and most of these had model variations such as the TS-9DX Turbo TubeScreamer for example. From these the TS-808, TS-9 and more recently the TS-10 have become the mainstays on many guitars boards however the internal designs of the TS-808 and in TS-9 are what causes discussion. It simply comes down to the components used, the OPamp chip sets used in pedals aren't made FOR pedals in fact they're used in many products throughout the world. eventually new chip sets come along which does the job better for the majority of products so they are discontinued or made in such small quantities that they become prohibitively expensive. Companies change the chips for something close and people often prefer the original sound of the original chip set. This means the early Tubescreamers with certain chips are coveted, rare and can be fairly expensive. Fear not though Tonepedia user as we have gone ahead and sourced some of the rarest pedals on earth including many Tubescreamers with different Chip sets for you to try such as the quintessential JRC4558D and JRC2043DD chips found in the crossover from 808's to TS-9 in the early 1980's. The JRC4558D is THE holy grail for most TS-9 fans who claim it has a slightly more pronounced mid range and causes the clipping have just the right amount of edge.The JRC2043DD is claimed to give a little slight lower mid to bass push and a very slight notch in the low treble regions.We also have a Malaysian chip 4558P TS-808 for you to compare with other tubescreamers including modern 808's. This chip is claimed to have a softer touch and causes an overall lower sounding pedal.For the sake of balance, there are many who claim components other than the opamp chips cause some of these artifacts and now YOU TOO can become an"expert" on the tones of tubescreamers by comparing them all here. So enjoy and let us know what your think. 

Ibanez TS9 Tube Screamer
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An all-time classic. There's no doubt about it, the Ibanez TS9 Tube Screamer is one of the, if not the most popular guitar overdrive out there. Guitar players such as Stevie Ray Vaughan used it as the TS9 really let's the sound and feel of the guitarist come through. It is one of the most copied pedals and was used as a basic circuit for many later pedals.Plugging it in makes you feel as if you went back in time. It sounds like old favourite records. This mid boost is really prominent and perfect for rock and blues as it cuts through the mix, yet keeping your initial guitar tone right there.The Tube Screamer went through many variations. It started in the late 70's as the TS-808 Overdrive Pro, then in early 80's the first TS9 was produced and some more variations came after. Nevertheless, the Ibanez TS9 Tube Screamer remains the original - a must have!

Ibanez TS808 narrow box (1979)
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What Is and What Was  Briefly before the TS-9's and TS-808's we are familiar with, came a prelude. Since these now cost thousands of which ever currency you use, they are not an everyday item so at a glimpse you'd be forgiven for mistaking this as an early 80's 808 but look a little closer and the differences are fairly striking. The first and most obvious difference is the overall width, yes that's right ... the 808 narrow is, well narrower than the standard 808 ... who would've thought! There is however much more, for example the battery compartment is only accessible via removing the back of the enclosure (like an MXR pedal) whereas later models have a plastic covered hatch. The DC input is on the side next to the input jack and the volume knob on many is labelled "Balance".Internally there were slight differences of the circuit including two 1458 chips used as an early basic dual op amp, others use the sort after (yet more common) 4558 type chips. Interestingly some had the Malaysian Texas Instruments RC4558P chip instead of the normal Japanese JRC4558 chip. We'd like to acknowledge the Analogman & Tonehome websites for filling in some of the gaps on this ultra rare pedal! Compare the TS808 Narrow to other vintage TS808s and TS9s we have tonecaptured to see which tubescreamer fan you really are!

Ibanez TS808 (1981)
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Not just rare, you could call this blue! The TS-808 established itself back in the late 70's and since then the tube screamer has become one of the (if not THE) most popular pedals of all time. Many people claim to be experts about what makes the early tubescreamers authentic and better than those which came later. There is a simple truth, the original designs had a multitude of component changes during their runs because on the scale of things the number of chipsets Ibanez and Maxon were using was tiny compared to the major electronics manufacturers and therefore they took what was on offer/available at the time. The original designs called for a 4558 chip but didn't specifically state which 4558!Most commonly the JRC4558D is regarded as THE tubescreamer chip, these chips were seen in other pedals of course including certain Boss pedals. A chip which gets us nerds pretty excited is the TL4558P ... can you feel the mojo .. . .This chip has been well regarded by those who have been lucky enough experience it, they are super rare and therefore also super expensive. It's worth noting that legendary pedal builder Analogman uses these chips in his tuberscreamer mods (when he can get them), its suggested they're a little bit cleaner and more open sounding. It's up to you to decide so here we've tonecaptured one of the rarest tubescreamers ever, let us know what you think! 

Ibanez TS9 (1982)
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Are original run of Tubescreamers still the best? There are a few things in life which can divide friends and families. Politics, religion and yes ... Tube screamer chips.So if you're reading this you most likely know what the tube screamer is but to be safe, it's a low gain overdrive pedal which rolls off some low end and has a very specific mid frequency bump. Using our demo turn the gain down low, set the tone at noon and switch the pedal on and off to hear this fairly change fairly clearly.Throughout the years the Tubescreamer has gone through many many changes, six main models 808, TS-9, TS-10, TS-7 and the TS-5 and most of these had model variations such as the TS-9DX Turbo TubeScreamer for example. From these the TS-808, TS-9 and more recently the TS-10 have become the mainstays on many guitars boards however the internal designs of the TS-808 and in TS-9 are what causes discussion. It simply comes down to the components used, the OPamp chip sets used in pedals aren't made FOR pedals in fact they're used in many products throughout the world. eventually new chip sets come along which does the job better for the majority of products so they are discontinued or made in such small quantities that they become prohibitively expensive. Companies change the chips for something close and people often prefer the original sound of the original chip set. This means the early Tubescreamers with certain chips are coveted, rare and can be fairly expensive. Fear not though Tonepedia user as we have gone ahead and sourced some of the rarest pedals on earth including many Tubescreamers with different Chip sets for you to try such as the quintessential JRC4558D and JRC2043DD chips found in the crossover from 808's to TS-9 in the early 1980's. The JRC4558D is THE holy grail for most TS-9 fans who claim it has a slightly more pronounced mid range and causes the clipping have just the right amount of edge.The JRC2043DD is claimed to give a little slight lower mid to bass push and a very slight notch in the low treble regions.We also have a Malaysian chip 4558P TS-808 for you to compare with other tubescreamers including modern 808's. This chip is claimed to have a softer touch and causes an overall lower sounding pedal.For the sake of balance, there are many who claim components other than the opamp chips cause some of these artifacts and now YOU TOO can become an"expert" on the tones of tubescreamers by comparing them all here. So enjoy and let us know what your think. 

Ibanez AD Mini
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Quality analog delay for the small board. The Ibanez AD Mini / Analog Delay Mini pedal delivers quality analog delay tone in a small unit which will fit onto almost every pedalboard on earth - yes, even if it's really cramped.The Ibanez AD Mini offers a delay time range from 20ms to 600ms. Dial it to a short delay time to get slapback delay, or to a longer time to get that space delay sound. The signal path is 100% analog, and true-bypass switching completely takes the effect out of your guitar's signal path when disengaged.Fiddling with the blend and feedback knobs on stage can be tricky, due to their size, but the most important knob, the time knob, is a standard sized one which is comfortable to tweak around.To sum it up, the Ibanez AD Mini / Analog Delay Mini is small, neat and a great addition to your low-in-space pedal board.

Ibanez TS808 Tube Screamer
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TS-808 ... where everything began. These days, we guitarists have an unprecedented variety of effect pedals to choose from - basically every unit you can image is somewhere out there. But still you can spot this bright green pedal on so many pedalboards wherever you look and that is for a really good reason!The legendary Ibanez TS-808 is around since the late 70's and has become, thanks to the characteristic midrange presence and the way it interacts with a tube amp's preamp, a favorite of so many guitar players around the globe. While preserving the characteristics of the guitar and amp, it adds sustain, edge, harmonic liveliness and a tightness to the bottom end that guitarists like Stevie Ray Vaughan desired from the first moment on.The current TS-808 is faithful reproduction of the original with the same JRC4558D IC chip and an analog circuitry.